Prisoners of Hope

For a while now I have been having a hard time with the biblical concept of hope. I confess that at times hope seemed like a cruel joke. Paul said, “these three remain: faith, hope, and love.” Faith is important I could see and love, of course. But what’s so great about hope?

For a while now I have been having a hard time with the biblical concept of hope. I confess that at times hope seemed like a cruel joke. Paul said, “these three remain: faith, hope, and love.” Faith is important I could see and love, of course. But what’s so great about hope?

What if you hope and hope, and pray and pray, and nothing seems to change? Zechariah (9:12 NASB) says, “Return to your fortress, O prisoners of hope” and that is how I have felt – like a prisoner, hoping almost against my will only because I knew Him and knew that He is good. But now I see that I didn’t really know what hope was. It is not wishful thinking, like “I wish things would get better” or “I hope I can find a job.” That kind of “hope” only leads to depression because all you are looking at is what’s happening now, the situation at the moment.

David said, “Why are you in despair (sunk in depression, brought low), O my soul? And why have you become disturbed (disquieted, moaning and groaning) within me? Hope (be patient, be pained, stay, tarry, trust, wait) in God, for I shall again (yet!) praise Him For the help (Yeshua! salvation, deliverance) of His presence” (Psalm 42:5 NASB). Notice the “be pained” part. Yes, hope can be painful. But what is David saying here? “What’s wrong with you soul? Yes, things are terrible, but I will again – or yet – praise Him.”

That word translated “praise” is yadah in the Hebrew. Yadah means to shoot arrows, cast or throw down, give thanks, laud, praise, confess the name of God. What I saw was that David’s hope was not wishful, but his hope was in God – “the help of his Presence,” His word and His promise. So, yet!, he knew – he had hope – that someday he would shoot the arrows of praise for the salvation and deliverance that God was, even then, accomplishing. He looked not at the situation he was in, but forward to that day – that is hope.

Zechariah said, “return to your fortress.” Psalm 91:2 (NIV) identifies our fortress as God: “I will say of the LORD, ‘He is my refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust.'” So I am repenting, returning to my refuge, my fortress, to the Presence. I will hope, be patient (as possible), be pained (probably), wait and trust, while abiding, remaining present – meno (see The Art of Remaining Present).

Just a little end note. Right after this sweet revelation I found the sign shown above, a metal word Hope with an arrow shooting through it. It was made by an artisan in Haiti from an oil drum in the hope that its sale would help provide for a better future. It wasn’t until I got it home and hanging on the wall that it hit me – it is a reminder of hope for me too, that the arrows of praise will fly again. God is so good!

This blog is has also been published as a Bible study for free use in Hidden Treasure Bible Studies here Prisoners of Hope Bible Study